The Manson Boss punches above its weight and takes the new generation anchor into an entirely new league. And to show the extreme capability of Manson's latest creation, Manson hooked up a small 35lb Boss anchor, aimed at boats up to 12 tonnes and hooked it on to the back of a 90 tonne Auckland harbour tug. Here is how it went.

'Testing began on Auckland Harbour, with 40ft (12metres) of 5/16(8mm) chain and 3/8 (9.5mm) shackles and a scope of 5:1 using a 90 tonne tug boat, said Manson's Ned Wood.

'This rig exerted up to 2000kg (4500lb) of load on the Manson Boss - but bent all the shackles in the test rig!

'Manson testing staff returned to the dock, went to a local ships chandler and bought 5/8 (15.8mm) shackles and 60ft (18metres) of smaller half inch (12.7mm) chain.

'We went back out testing on the tug again and pulling on the 35lb (15.8kg) Manson Boss. This time testing had to stop at 4200kg (9250lb) because the 5/8 (15.8mm) shackles were all bending.

”From our tests, it would seem that the only problem you’re going to have with your new Manson Boss is that you could bend your shackles. How is that for peace of mind?' he asks.

Wood says the design brief for the new Manson Boss was focused on faster setting, with greater holding power.

A strong, reliable anchor is the most important piece of safety equipment aboard any boat, being able to stop a bad situation getting worse and allowing a boat to hold a position until assistance arrives, or repairs can be effected.

”As well, when cruising, you sleep soundly at night,” said Wood.

“We all know there is nothing worse than your anchor dragging and having to get up at 3am and untangle your boat from the boat next door - with frayed tempers all around.”

Have a close look at all of the power house features the Boss packs.